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The Illusion of Choice

Tess Chilton As this chart shows ten mega corporations control the output of almost everything we buy, not just in regards to food but everything from our clothes to household products. For example the $200- billion corporation Nestle, is the biggest food company in the world and owns 8,000 different brands worldwide, which include L’Oreal shampoo, Gerber baby food and Diesal jeans. That is a scary thought. I myself feel pretty trapped in this cycle.

http://www.policymic.com/articles/71255/10-corporations-control-almost-everything-you-buy-this-chart-shows-how

Going to the grocery store is now a daunting task of trying to figure out what is GMO safe and trying to figure out what companies you are supporting by buying certain brands. Even going to grocery stores that are supposedly organic can be misleading.

The app Buycott could be a step in the right direction. Last year Ivan Pardo created the app Buycott, which is an app that gives shoppers the ability have easy access to make smart decisions about what they are supporting when they buy certain brands. Using your I- phone you can scan the barcode on any product and it will show you the products corporate family tree all the way to its top parent company. You can also join user-created campaigns that will help you boycott businesses that don’t fallow your principles. A great campaign option is Demand GMO Labeling, which will tell you if the owners of the product you are interested in donated more than $150,000 to oppose the mandatory labeling of genetically modified foods. Another great aspect about this app is you can choose campaigns that tell you if brands openly support LGBT rights.

1 Comment

  1. ashleeeyvd

    What an awesome idea! I’d love to try it, although I’m curious how the app obtains it’s information, and whether the “Buycott” app provides info about the ethics of the parent company. It seems like many of those corporations keep as tight a lid as possible on their sourcing, support, etc.; I remember researching a purportedly ‘clean’ company once only to find they sourced their cotton in an unethical way — but it took hours of research and a persistent hunt to get this info. If these app creators have figured out a way to condense this info, and it’s accurate, sign me up!

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